Oct. 14, 2021

How to Interpret Dreams (written by a robot)

Interpreting your own dreams can help you better understand yourself, relieve stress, and simply have fun exploring the mysterious world of sleep! While dream interpretation isn’t an exact science and every person has different experiences and reactions to their dreams, there are still ways to learn how to interpret your own dreams and what they mean to you. Here are some tips on how to interpret your own dreams and unlock their meaning!

 

1) Identify the Unconscious


If you’re interpreting your own dreams, first look into Freudian analysis of dreams. Sigmund Freud was an Austrian psychoanalyst who developed his own methodology for dream interpretation based on psychological principals. One of his main conclusions is that many symbols in dreams are directly related to events and people in our everyday lives, so if you can remember what you were doing or thinking about before you had a particular dream, that might help decipher some symbols within it.

 

2) What is a Dream?


A dream is any thought or imaginings which occur during sleep. At first glance, dreams might appear as a series of disjointed images and ideas. However, we can learn a lot from our dreams, if we just know how to interpret them correctly. Here’s how you can learn to interpret your own dreams

 

3) Get Familiar With Symbolism


An important aspect of dream interpretation is learning about symbolism. Symbols have many different meanings depending on how they are used, so it’s a good idea to first familiarize yourself with common symbols and their meanings before you set out interpreting your own dreams. Think of a symbol as a language: every symbol has a word-root meaning, but words themselves also have countless connotations and associations—for example, cake can mean celebration or comfort.

 

4) Determine if It's Really Just a Dream


If you aren’t sure whether a dream is really a dream, or you remember it in more detail than most dreams, consider what your senses might have been registering. For example, if you were dreaming about a bright red sports car and woke up with a headache from squinting at a bright light, then it's quite possible that your senses registered that experience during sleep. The same goes for smells or sounds.

 

DISCLAIMER: 

Hey, Zac here. We hired an artificial intelligence to write this blog post and I have done no editing whatsoever. Why did I hire an AI to write the official LOL with Kim Gravel blog? Easy, because I thought it would be funny. Even if this sounds like good advice please remember that this is a parody blog written by a robot and it contains no actual advice from a real human. In fact, at times the robot is hilariously wrong about simple facts. Enjoy.